La Dolce Vita: Roma + Atrani

 

Italy: layers of color, texture, history and parmigiano reggiano.

This post is for the beauty-curious and the seekers of adventure in life. I am publishing these photos not just to share my journey, but to give you the appetite for inspired living. The photos do not do this trip justice, nor am I exposing these moments of my life for the sake of doing just that. My greatest interest is to connect those who want to see the the world with the spark to go follow their curiosity.

Couper and I decided to book the tickets just the month before when a block of time opened. Sidenote: some things take many years, while some things happen sooner than you think. There is no way we could take in all the big Italian cities in 9 days, so we flew into Rome for four days, and then to Atrani, on the Amalfi Coast, for five days. Below are images first of Rome, the center of so much astounding history. The latter images are from time spent in Atrani, Ravello, Positano, and Amalfi.

A few words to go with the images: Italy is robust; it’s all over the buildings, the language, the food, and the lifestyle. In the morning or evening when the light streams in from the side, the punchy oranges, reds, and pinks that line the streets come to life. The people are inviting and warm like the buildings they occupy and the food they make - woah. You really have not had pasta until you have been to Italy. So much history and art is present that there would be ruins of gorgeous corinthian columns just laying through the city.

The aperitivos come with my favorite time of day: after a well-spent afternoon, and in anticipation of the hazy twinkling of lights and dimly lit terraces that will soon begin buzzing. What is remarkable about Rome is not only the amount of churches, but they way they are positioned in the squares. From the biggest to smallest piazzas, a church will be towering above you- astounding you. Romans, and then Italians, are masters of perspective. The churches are presented in a way that you are observing their intricacies from right beside them - drawn into their facades by the other buildings. It’s magnificent. We visited the major sights and museums, but I equally loved wandering through the City Center and Trastevere. The smooth gray square city stones lead you through enchanting turns. I found the streets of Rome wonderfully unplanned in that way, as if they grew from life rather than blueprints, making the wandering all the more fun (which you saw if you followed my snapchat: lindsay-cox).

Atrani is the smallest community in Italy (in size). It is a short walk from the town of Amalfi, is filled with locals, and has a market/store generally open on weekdays when it is not raining (ha! perfetto). The Amalfi coast is mountainous, with crystal blue water, and villas that rest on each other. You easily get lost in the corridors (in the best way, but yes, lost.) The lush plants and flowers are cascading and blooming over everything which definitely makes for welcome distraction. White walls, tunnels and large stone stairs weave in between humble homes, citrus groves, and churches. Our terrace overlooked Saint Maria Maddalena and the Tyrrhenian Sea. We welcomed the church bells, sunshine and the excitement of our days spent there. One of the best views I have ever seen was off of Villa Cimbrone in Ravello, an overlook where you see the bright water blend into the sky in the distance. We hiked to the 5-star villa, and I highly recommend going and walking through the gardens and stopping for some prosecco at the historical residence-turned-hotel.

I will leave my words there. Look and be encouraged. Make plans to see the world; don’t wait to do it if you can, even if it is a hike near the town that you have lived in for so long. Everything has a price and this life is too precious to not be spent seeing its wonders.

*All photos are available for purchase (US & Europe) at various sizes. If you do want a piece of Italy to hang on your wall to keep you dreaming, please email me for details. - L

LindsayCox.Rome.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Rome.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Rome.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Rome.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Rome.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Rome.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Rome.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Rome.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Rome.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Rome.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Rome.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Rome.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Rome.Italy.Photographer
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LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer
LindsayCox.Amalfi.Italy.Photographer